Photo Gallery Margate, Herne Bay & Swalecliffe

 

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Colouring:
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Tribute to Roy Beaven

PHOTO GALLERIES:

Intro + Photo permission

Patterns:
Shadows

Places:
Blue Bell Hill
Chatham
Crossness Engines
Crossness Ironwork

Eastbourne
Gravesend
Greenwich
Greenwich Cutty Sark
Hastings
Maidstone
Margate, Herne Bay xxx& Swalecliffe
Orpington
Otford & Shoreham
Ramsgate
Rochester 1
Rochester 2
Southend
Sheerness
Stockwood Park
Toad Rock
Tonbridge
Tunbridge Wells
Whitstable

Plants:
Autumn Leaves
Bluebell
Campanula 1
Campanula 2
Campanula 3
Daffodil Heads
Daffodil Groups
Fuchsia 1
Fuchsia 2
Lilac
Moss
Pansy Heads Cool
Pansy Heads Warm
Pansy Groups
Prunus Pink
Prunus White
  Sunflower
Tulip Heads 1
Tulip Heads 2
Tulip Groups

Weather:
Dawn
Frost & Ice
Sky 1 Warm
Sky 2 Cool
Sky 3 Stormy
Snow
Sunset
Weather Effects

Water:
Drops
Fountains
Puddles

Rivers 1
Rivers 2
Rivers 3
Rivers 4
Surface Patterns

Weirs/Waterfalls

Margate was Meregate in 1254, probably from mere geat "gap leading to the sea or pool". It is the archetypal seaside resort, being a traditional favourite destination for Londoners, with soft sandy beaches and shallow waters providing warmer waters for bathers. A Londoner might well call it Mar-Gitt with a hard G.

Margate bay and town

Margate beach and town

Seafront cafe and beach

Funfair on beach

Games on beach

Funfair chargers carousel
This fairground was behind one of the amusement arcades in town and not visible from the street (2007).

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Herne Bay gets its name from the village of Herne inland. In 1100 it was spelt Hyrnan, meaning "place at the angle/corner of land", probably referring to a turn in the Roman road.

August brings the Herne Bay Festival of family-friendly fun, according to their website www.hernebayfestival.co.uk

Herne Bay
2006. The sports pavilion has since been demolished and the pier is now furnished with a variety of vendors huts, rides, boating pool, food vendors and an observation deck at the end. http://hernebaypier.org/index.html

Interestingly, the pier knitters are busy making decorative models/toys for the pier. http://hernebaypier.org/knitters.html

Herne Bay pier  Herne Bay pier closeup
The remains of Herne Bay pier, engineered by Thomas Telford and opened in 1832. It was the second longest (behind Southend), this being made necessary by the shallow waters, bearing in mind that piers were built to enable pleasure boat passengers to disembark. 

Beach huts
I can imagine well togged-up swimmers emerging in bathing costumes identical to the huts blue, green, red and stripy.

Seafront shelter  Seafront shelter 2
Having arrived at the chosen seaside, no Brit would dream of being put off by the weather, preferring to sit it out regardless. Part of the Never Give In spirit, and also a bit of Getting Our Money's Worth Now We're Here. Every shelter should really have a plaque saying "I do believe it's brightening up a bit."

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Swalecliffe The name derives from either "swallows' riverbank" or "bank of the Swale watercourse", swale meaning "rushing water"

Swalecliffe seafront looking east
Looking west towards Whitstable, at the end of the afternoon

Swalecliffe seafront looking west
Swalecliffe seafront (2 photos joined). The headland in the distance is Margate, with Herne Bay out of sight inbetween.

Promontory
Walk eastwards past the huts and on to a shingly grassy promontory

Marsh river  Grassland
Marsh/grassland between Swalecliffe and Herne Bay. An ideal place to enjoy big skies and breezes. Swalecliffe's long empty seafront is totally quiet and peaceful, with the grassy areas and backs of residential and caravan parks coming down to the coast pathway. The only sound was that of the breeze in the grass and occasional seagull.

Grasses
Maybe not a place for hayfever sufferers

Tide notice
I would add to this, beware anger of any sort

Swalecliffe caravans

Back of caravan park right by the seafront. I  remember a caravan holiday here when very young, flying my kite on the green. One day, I had hurriedly pulled in my kite without winding up the string, as the kite was threatening to come down on a mudflat. The inevitable impossible tangle was noticed by a passerby who commiserated "That's what's called a crow's nest."

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My websites for free Pitman's New Era Shorthand resources:

www.long-live-pitmans-shorthand.org.uk Shorthand theory & downloads

www.long-live-pitmans-shorthand-reading.org.uk Blog articles in shorthand, with text key, for shorthand reading practice

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